Thursday, September 9, 2010

Mloukhieh - Jew's Mallow



Mloukhieh (or as called in English Jew’s mallow), is an Egyptian national dish which is widely popular in Lebanon and is actually one of my favorite dishes. This leafy green vegetable has a mucilaginous texture, similar to okra, when cooked.

It features in the cuisines of Lebanon, Israel, Syria, Jordan, and Tunisia. Each region has it own version. The basic recipe for Egyptian mloukhieh is to chop the leaves finely and add dry crushed coriander, but it is very important not to allow the mloukhieh to boil as it coagulates and becomes inedible.



Mloukhieh is cooked into a viscous soup, flavored with coriander and garlic, then poured onto rice and decorated with pieces of cooked chicken and with grilled Arabic bread.

Mloukhieh leaves can be found at any Middle Eastern grocer and most likely in frozen form. Although, fresh leaves were used in the following recipe, using frozen is fine as well.



Ingredients: (serves 4)
For the mloukhieh:
1 kg Jew’s Mallow, fresh or frozen, finely chopped. (If using frozen, thaw first)
500 g corriander, finely chopped
4 onions, finely chopped
8 garlic cloves, pounded with a pinch of salt
1 tsp white pepper
salt, to taste
1 tbsp olive oil

For the chicken:
500 g skinless chicken breast
2 bay leaves
1 onion, halved
1 liter water
salt and pepper

For the dressing:
1 red onion, finely diced
1 cup apple vinegar

For the rice:
Basmati rice, cooked according to package instructions

Toasted arabic bread

In a deep pot, add the chicken, bay leaves, the halved onion, salt and pepper. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Simmer 40 mn or until cooked.

Meanwhile, prepare the mloukhieh, heat 1 tbsp of olive oil in a pot, add the diced onions, and cook 3 mn. Add the garlic, cook for 1 mn, add the coriander and stir. Strain in the chicken broth. Add the white pepper and salt. Then add the chopped mloukhieh.

Stir, cover and cook 10 mn on medium low. Do not allow to boil.

Cut bread into small squares. Grill them in the oven.
In a small bowl, make the dressing by mixing the onions and vinegar. Set aside.

Cook the rice.

In a serving plate put hot rice, shred the chicken and add them on top of the rice.
Cover with hot Jews mallow stew.
Garnish with bread and onion mixture.

 

Mouloukhieh

Ingrédients: (4 personnes)
Pour la mloukhieh: 
1 kg de mouloukhieh, finement haché (frais ou surgelé; si les feuilles sont surgelées laissez les décongeler)
500 g de coriandre, hachée
4 oignons, finement hachés
8 gousses d'ail, écrasées avec du sel
1 càc de poivre blanc
sel, selon goût
1 càs d'huile d'olive

Pour le poulet:
500 g de poulet
2 feuilles de laurier
1 oignon, coupé en 2
1 litre d'eau
sel et poivre

Pour le dressing:
1 oignon rouge, finement haché
1 verre de vinaigre de cidre

Pour le riz:
Riz Basmati, cuit selon les instructions du paquet.

Pain arabe grillé

Dans une grande marmite, mettez le poulet, les feuilles de laurier, l'oignon coupé en 2, le sel et le poivre. Couvrez avec de l'eau et portez à ébullition. Laissez cuire 40 mn ou jusqu'à ce que le poulet soit cuit.

Pendant ce temps, préparez la mouloukhieh. Faites chauffer 1 càs d'huile d'olive dans une casserole, ajoutez les oignons hachés, faites les revenir 3 mn. Ajoutez l'ail écrasé et laissez revenir 1 mn. Ajoutez la coriandre et mélangez. Filtrez le bouillon dans la casserole. Assaisonnez de sel et de poivre blanc. Puis ajoutez la mouloukhieh hachée.

Mélangez, couvrez et laissez cuire 10 mn sur feu doux. Ne laissez pas bouillir.

Coupez le pain en petits carrés. Faites les griller au four.
Dans un bol, mélangez les onions et le vinaigre. Réservez.

Faites cuire le riz.

Dans un plat de service, mettez le riz chaud, ajoutez le poulet émiétté.
Couvrez avec la mouloukhieh.
Parsemez de pain grillé et du dressing au vinaigre.

22 comments:

  1. Oh, yummy! That dish looks so delicious! I love the idea. I've never eaten Jew’s Mallow...

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  2. Very, very interesting. Great post and a beautiful dish. My Lebanese hubby would love this dish.

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  3. What an interesting dish, Cherine. Your photos of this dish are wonderful. Now to find a source for Jew's Mallow. I hope you are having a great day. Blessings...Mary

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  4. Cherine

    I have to admit, this is not my all-time favorite but I will eat it at family gathering and it epitomizes family get-togethers and remind me of my grandma who used to dry the leaves on a sheet on her bed and chop them by hand!

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  5. moi la mouloukhieh je la connais en poudre et j'en raffole! merci de me faire découvrir cette autre variante!

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  6. This is a beautiful dish! I've never eaten Mouloukhieh but it looks delish! You have a lovely blog, I'll be visiting you often!

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  7. Molokhia is my hubby's absolute favorite dish! We've never had it with the bread/onion mixture on top, I bet it's fantastic though...I can't wait to try that! Your presentation of it is really beautiful!

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  8. You learn something new every day! Thanks for teaching me about this tasty looking dish!

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  9. A very unique dish, I would love to try this!

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  10. I feel like I've eaten this before and really liked it. Can't remember where! Anyway, thanks for the recipe!

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  11. Gorgeous dish! Love all the new flavors!

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  12. Coucou,

    Merci pour ton commentaire qui m'a fait découvrir ton super blog aux belles photos et bons plats de notre région ;-)

    J'ai mangé de la mloukhieh hier, j'aime trop ce plat !

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  13. I have never had jew's mellow...a very beautiful and delectable dish!

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  14. A complet dish, I love the colors!

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  15. Wow so interesting! Would love to taste this one day, but I think I will have to venture outside my own country to track down Jew's Mallow.

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    Replies
    1. it is readily available worldwide in its frozen state wherever you find a large concentration of either jews or arabs

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  16. Well you learn something new everyday, don't we. Have never heard of Jew's Mallow, but sure looks inviting.

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  17. Oh, I wish I knew about this dish last year- I actually grew mallow in my garden, but couldn't figure out a single thing to do with it!

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  18. Hannah, you're amazing. I never knew someone that is growing something without knowing what to do with!!!

    I like your style :)

    For those who didn't try this dish yet, I suggest you go immediately to your kitchens and start this recipe right now. Believe me it's very tasty

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  19. Hey Chicho, beautiful blog! Thanks for dropping by mine. I love your clean aesthetic, it sets off the food really nicely and you have a lot of interesting stuff here I've never heard of which is refreshing ^_^ The photographs that go with this post are really interesting, is it a speacial kind of filter you use?

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  20. My favorite way to eat this soup is with Frito corn chips on top, I know it sounds weird, but completely awesome!

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  21. I don't know anyone who puts coriander in this dish and it seems like the ratio of jew's mallow to coriander is WAY too high you're talking half a kilogram of coriander to 1 kilogram of mallow maybe you have a typo? and your supposed to sauté the mallow a bit before you add it to the broth mixture especially if its fresh because it has that slimy texture okra gets when you boil it

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